How TV and movie zombies have evolved from the mindless undead to superhuman killing machines – Yahoo News

"Army of the Dead" opening.Netflix

Zombies originate from Haitian Folklore and have been in stories for centuries.

With "Night of the Living Dead," George Romero set the framework for the zombies we see in media today.

Over the last 100 years, zombies have turned from something spiritual to human-killing monsters.

Originating from Haitian folklore, the mythology of zombies has evolved significantly over the last hundred years in TV and film.

This transformation began in 1968 with George Romero's "Night of the Living Dead," the first to give zombies a craving for human flesh.

Syfy recently brought zombies back to where they began by premiering a new "Day of the Dead" series named after one of George Romero's original zombie movies. The series pays homage to Romero's zombies whilst also highlighting how much they have changed by making its zombies more grotesque.

Night of the Living Dead

The dead rise from their graves unaided for the first time in "Night of the Living Dead."Image Ten

The History Channel website reports that zombies originate from Haitian folklore and are believed to be reanimated as mindless soulless creatures and controlled by a voodoo sorcerer called a Bokor.

After being brought to the West, early zombie movies continued this myth including "White Zombie," which is regarded as the first-ever zombie movie. This changed with "Night of the Living Dead," directed by George Romero, the start of the transformation of zombies on-screen.

With Romero's 1968 movie and its sequels, the zombies had no controller or agenda except for a need to consume human flesh. Romero was the first to make every dead person part of the undead rather than a specific few and created key zombie traits such as zombie's iconic awkward shambling walking.

There are some traits that Romero can't take credit for such as brain-eating, which was introduced in the horror-comedy "The Return of the Living Dead" in 1985.

Story continues

Resident Evil

"Resident Evil" is one of the most successful game adaptation movie series.Constantin Film

In Romero's movies, people would turn into zombies regardless of whether they were bitten or not. However, the idea of a zombie virus, which started with 1992's "Dead Alive," is now a more common explanation for how the undead exist and expand their numbers.

This idea, along with fast-moving zombies, became popular after the success of "Resident Evil" and "The House of the Dead" revitalized interest in the undead in the late 20th century. Andrew Garland, the writer behind "28 days later" credited "Resident Evil" specifically as reviving the zombie genre after its release in 1996.

"Sometimes '28 Days Later' is credited with reviving the zombie genre in some respect, but actually, I think it was 'Resident Evil' that did it because I remember playing 'Resident Evil,' having not really encountered zombies for quite a while and thinking: 'Oh, my God, I love zombies! I'd forgotten how much I love zombies. These are awesome!'" Garland told the Huffington Post in 2015.

The movie adaptation of "Resident Evil" in the early 2000s, followed shortly by box-office hits "28 Days Later" and Zack Snyder's "Dawn of the Dead" remake, cemented the zombie virus and running zombies in popular culture. "The Walking Dead" is one of the few exceptions of recent zombie stories that keep the zombies slow.

Zombies tend to be more monster-like in recent zombie movies and shows including Syfy's "Day of the Dead" reboot.Sergei Bachlakov / DOTD S1 Productions / SYFY

Although zombies' change in looks in movies largely has to do with the technology and materials available for makeup and practical effects, there are vast differences between monster-like zombies as seen in "The Walking Dead" and human-like zombies as seen in "Train to Busan."

Todd Masters, an Emmy award-winning makeup effects artist who worked on the latest "Day of the Dead" Syfy series, told Insider that whilst make-up teams are trained to be able to do different types of zombies, they are not usually given the budget to do so.

"['The Walking Dead' makeup team] really put a lot of time and effort into [zombies] because they have the time and the budget. We did not, and so it kinda pulled us away from that look," Masters said about creating the look for the zombies in "Day of the Dead." "We were really looking to like Italian zombie movies. It's kind of not designed. They're messy, and they're drippy and there's fizzy shit going on."

Santa Clarita Diet

Zombies are able to pass as human in recent zombie tv shows such as "Santa Clarita Diet."Lara Solanki / Netflix

The 21st century's evolution of zombies was less to do with how zombies act. Instead, zombies are being brought into other genres such as zombie comedies, which started in 1985 with "The Return of the Living Dead," and zombie love stories, which started with 1993's "My Boyfriend's Back." This has been seen in notable zombie movies in the last 20 years like "Shaun of the Dead" and "Warm Bodies."

TV series such as "iZOMBIE" and "Santa Clarita Diet" took this one step further by humanizing their zombies, making zombies the protagonist fighting the urge to become monsters.

This all comes together with "Army of the Dead," which is in the top 10 of Netflix's most-watched original movies ever and has the most advanced zombies ever. "Army of the Dead" not only mixes the heist genre with zombies but also makes their zombies communicate with each other almost like an animal pack.

Over the 11 seasons of "The Walking Dead," audiences have seen the walkers go through several stages of decay.Josh Stringer/AMC

Zack Snyder, who directed the movie, told Insider that he particularly wanted to make his zombies "sympathetic."

"I liked this idea that the zombies aren't just killing us, they're here to replace us in some way ... like eventually there could just be a planet of the dead," Snyder said.

It seems that the next stage in evolution is making the undead human again, a trend that has been seen with every other iconic monster from aliens to vampires.

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Zombie properties a growing problem in Capital Region The Daily Gazette – The Daily Gazette

Schenectady appears headed toward resolving a battle with a spate of zombie properties, while the quaint town of Milton finds itself in a similar fight.

A zombie property is one that has been abandoned by its owner after a foreclosure process begins.

The lender usually a bank has yet to take ownership, nor has it sold it, leaving the property in an abandoned state of overgrown lawns and exposure to the elements.

Zombie properties became particularly prevalent during the countrys 2007-2008 financial crisis.

Schenectady, the states ninth-largest city with a population of about 65,000, has been vocal about its decades-long history of vacant, dilapidated properties.

Milton, a self-described picturesque community of less than 19,000 in central Saratoga County, appears to be charting a less litigious, quieter course toward remedying zombie properties.

In July, Schenectady Mayor Gary McCarthy joined mayors of Albany and Troy in calling attention to those properties, announcing a first-of-its kind, three-city effort to sue the lending institutions of 18 zombie properties responsible for failed maintenance and whose owner of record was the same bank: Ocwen Financial Corp., of New Jersey.

Seven of the properties are in Schenectady, and the three mayors, in an effort to illustrate how zombie properties can plague neighborhoods, stood in front of a zombie property in Troy that is on an otherwise quiet street with a church.

Reached Wednesday, McCarthy shared that the ongoing litigation was headed toward a favorable outcome.

Were in negotiations with the banks for a settlement, McCarthy said. He declined to elaborate, but agreed that a settlement is in the citys best interest, considering the properties could continue to languish during lengthy litigation.

In Milton, Supervisor Benny Zlotnick was hesitant to call attention to the properties. He said he would only provide a couple of the addresses to the Daily Gazette if it agreed not to publish the addresses and the owners of record.

Our concern is letting the world know these homes arent occupied, Zlotnick said.

This isnt like Schenectady or Albany where it may be a zombie property, but theres tons of people around it, he continued, alluding to squatters. This could be on a stretch of road where theres nobody around, and the next thing you know, youve got someone sitting in thereWe dont want to advertise that.

The Daily Gazette will issue a request for the properties and owners through the state Freedom of Information Law.

To address zombie properties, Milton is in the midst of accepting bids to hire a property maintenance company to board up, mow twice monthly from May to September, and plow and shovel snow from the property after major storms of five inches or more of snow.

The deadline for request for proposals is Dec. 13.

The Town of Milton has properties in the midst of foreclosure procedures that are not being maintained, the bid read. We also have abandoned properties that need to be maintained. Yards are overgrown and driveways are not plowed, causing dangerous situations in the event of a fire or other emergency.

The town building inspector will bring an abandoned and/or unsafe property to the attention of the Town Board, according to the bid. The property owner will be given a notification to correct the issue. If the owner refuses to comply, the contracted company will be notified for maintenance. The building inspector will specify the work to be done on a property-by-property basis.

Zlotnick appeared to downplay the magnitude of the concern in Milton.

We have a few a very small handful, perhaps, he said. But were trying to, before it gets out of hand, come up with a plan that will allow for the town to hire a company to maintain those properties when the owners are unavailable or unwilling to do so so that the property values around that property are not affected.

Contact reporter Brian Lee at [emailprotected] or 518-419-9766.

Categories: Saratoga County, Schenectady County

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Hellbound Creator Yeon Sang-ho Details Season 2 Plans, Teases Third Zombie Movie in World of Train to Busan – Variety

Netflixs latest genre offering from Korea, dark sci-fi thriller Hellbound, doesnt waste any time in getting straight to the action. In the first minutes of the pilot, giant, billowing demons think The Hulk meets an evil Michelin Man erupt into the heart of Seoul to torture and scorch to death one of the damned members of the public.

That is, literally damned. The show is set in an alternate reality in which angels appear before individuals who have committed some wrongdoing to tell them of their impending demise. When the time comes, demons barrel onto Earth to mete out a grisly death sentence. In their orbit is The New Truth, a cult-like group of individuals that supports the supernatural arbiters of justice, led by insidious grandmaster Jeong Jin-soo.

Hellbound creator Yeon Sang-ho is perhaps best known internationally to date for acclaimed zombie thrillers Train to Busan (2016) and Peninsula (2020). The former live-action film starring Gong Yoo as a father shepherding his daughter to safety amid a zombie apocalypse was preceded by animated prequel Seoul Station released the same year.

Similarly, Hellbound began life as a two-part animated film before being extended into a webtoon for Korean digital platform Naver. The latter provided a handy proof of concept for a live-action series that was ultimately commissioned by Netflix. The show is currently the streamers top non-English language series globally, just ahead of that other Korean TV sensation Squid Game in third place.

In an interview with Variety, working with a translator provided by Netflix, Yeon discusses the origins of Hellbound, plans for season 2 and teases a potential third installment in his zombie trilogy that falls somewhere between Train to Busan and Peninsula.

The short animation was in 2002, and then the webtoon actually began about two years ago on Naver, with co-creator and cartoon artist Choi Kyu-Seok. During the process of planning and creating the cartoon for Hellbound, we did talk about wanting to create a live-action series. However, the webtoons started to [stream] on the platform when I was actually shooting the film Peninsula. Before that, we had just been talking about [a live-action series], but after [the webtoon] began on the platform, Netflix and I began to discuss creating it into a live series.

When my partner Kyu-Seok and I were planning and thinking of the story, and creating the process, we thought of a universe that had very supernatural things happening. So [there are] demonstrations and the prophecies, and then we thought about the kinds of things that would happen in this supernatural or created universe. We kind of just brainstormed all the ideas that we could think of, and then tried to pick from those, thinking, What can we bring together to create into a single storyline? The characters that you see in Hellbound are very grounded. Theyre people you see in the real world. But at the same time, we wanted to make sure that none of the things that happened in this universe would remind you of anything that happened in our real world. And I would say that those two methods were used as a tool for us to create a world that was very believable and convincing. It was almost comparable to a simulation game.

When we were working on this story, we were set on creating a world that was comparable to hell, and created by people who are unable to tolerate uncertainty and we wanted to show what the society would look like when convictions are in conflict with one another. In order to do that, it meant that we needed to have multiple characters who had multiple convictions. Thats how I came about having a number of protagonists.

I personally enjoyed Squid Game very much as well. And I feel like the vision that it had within it, being a genre drama, was very relatable and there were a lot of points within the show that I was able to relate to as well. I think that both shows have their own entertainment elements. And as for where those points lie within the show, its all different. I think that Squid Game was able to really resonate with a lot of people. Also theres that entertainment factor of drawing from childhood games as well. I think with Hellbound as well, these are pieces that lead to a lot of active conversation among the audiences. I think thats where both of their entertainment factors comes from.

Gong Yoo in Yeon Sang-hos Train to Busan (2016).Next Entertainment World

Culture is always developed by influencing one another. When I was younger, in Asia, Hong Kong films were all the rage with genres like noir and some of the more kitschy ones. There was also a lot of love within Korea for Japanese animation as well. As a child, I was heavily influenced by all of those great creative works that came from outside Korea and I believe that that was what led me to be the creator that I am today. As for the way that Korean content is so well received and loved by global audiences, I think its just that the level of trust that Korean content has gained in the past has accumulated one by one and layer by layer and it has hit a certain point where its now become an explosive impetus. I feel like we are very much in that wave.

I will say that its true, the process of working with Netflix was very enjoyable on my end. They very much agreed to and related to my creative vision, but they also created an environment where I didnt have to think about anything else aside from focusing on my creativity in terms of distribution or when or how to release the series. Because Hellbound is based on the original webtoons, my partner Choi Kyu-Seok and I have decided that the story afterwards will be told first through the webtoon and, as for whether we would want to turn that into another live-action series, thats something that we will need further discussion on. As you know, we have only just released Hellbound Season 1 and so we didnt have any time to discuss that issue with Netflix. So I would say this is something we need further discussion on.

I believe that the zombie genre is very traditional but at the same time, depending on what you bring to that, it can be completely new. Personally, I do have some ideas in terms of further development of what happens after Peninsula. But as for whether I will create that into a film, its something that I do want to do. However, because there are a lot of productions that Im working on currently, Im thinking that I have to sort of organize the ideas and work on what I have to work on. Up until now I have been someone whos been an individual creator. But these days Im thinking that maybe I need to come up with a system in order to really bring all of my creative visions to life.

There are a lot of ideas Ive been tossing around but I personally think that for Train to Busan, I would like to continue that as a film series. In Korea, the circumstances are not very favorable to create a series in the Korean language with visuals that are comparable to Train to Busan the film and also, you know, I have to work with the distributor that we started on the original film as well. So I think taking into consideration all of those conditions, a film series would be the most feasible.

I would say that in terms of that universe theyll all become related together. Peninsula was a post-apocalyptic film that focused on the car chases. The story that Im thinking about after that would be closer to Train to Busan, where the story will be carried out in a small and restricted space. Thats something that I have in mind currently. So in terms of the genre, you could say that its between Train to Busan and Peninsula.

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Yeon Sang-ho Talks Season 2 of ‘Hellbound’ and Third Zombie Movie – – The Nerd Stash

Yeon Sang-ho has discussed his plans for Season 2 of the Netflix hit Hellbound. The demon-hunting series has become one of the most-watched series on the streaming platform in multiple countries. Yeon Sang-ho created and directed the hit series. He also directed the zombie mega-hitsTrain to Busan andPeninsula. The seriesHellbound originally started as a short animation in 2002. It was followed by a webtoon on Naver withHellboundco-creator Choi Kyu-sok. Sang-ho and Kyu-sok wanted to make it into a live-action series for many years and got that opportunity with Netflix.Hellbound has even surpassedSquid Games record. Sang-ho doesnt mind the comparison between his series andSquid Gamebut thinks they are unique in their own way.

TheHellbound co-creator said that experience with Netflix while making the series was enjoyable. The director ofTrain to Busan wants a different approach for Season 2 of Hellbound.Netflix let him see his creative vision through. Choi Kyu-Seok and Yeon Sang-ho want to continue the Hellbound story as a webtoon first. Yeon Sang-ho has stated that there needs to be further discussion with Netflix for the future of Hellbound. He knows what his plans are forTrain to Busan.

Train to Busan changed how audiences viewed zombie movies. Sang-ho talked about zombie movies commenting, I believe that the zombie genre is very traditional but at the same time, depending on what you bring to that, it can be completely new. Yeon Sang-ho already has ideas brewing for life afterPeninsula. He does not seeTrain to Busan doing well as a television adaptation. The creator ofNetflixsHellbound knows that he wants to turn the zombie movies into a film series. The story that Im thinking about after that would be closer to Train to Busan, where the story will be carried out in a small and restricted space, Yeon Sang-ho said regarding the third installment.

No matter what Yeon Sang-ho comes up with, he has made many fans that look forward to his future work.

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Recap: Weddings, funerals, and sexy time: Day of the Dead Ep. 7 gets at what it means to be a human (and not a zombie) – SYFY WIRE

To err is human, to forgive divine, and to devour your friends and family in a crazed, insatiable feeding frenzy distinctly zombie.

But the differences between the living and their undead counterparts run deeper than just their respective dietary preferences. And in Episode 7 of Day of the Dead, we get a sense of what those differences really boil down to: the forming and practice of rituals.

Whether it's planning and then canceling the (expensive) union of two souls in marriage, burying their dead, or banding together to figure out how to rid themselves of a hostile presence running amok in their village, human beings have a capacity to defy the chaos of the universe that zombies just don't.

But is it enough to survive?

**SPOILER WARNING! Spoilers ahead for Day of the Dead Season 1, Episode 7, "This Evil Was Our Evil."**

It's a somber 44 minutes in Mawinhaken.

The survivors have gathered in the alley behind the improvised refugee camp at the Paymart to pay their respects to one of their own: the fallen Trey Bowman (Christopher Russell), the Mayor's (Miranda Frigon) cuckolded husband and Luke's (Daniel Doheny) maybe-father. Amidst all the chaos, the townsfolk have still found time to honor those age-old human customs of affording their dead proper burials even if instead of a coffin, they've dumped Trey's body in a dumpster.

After some brief words of eulogy, Bowman takes no chances and lights the dumpster and Trey along with it on fire. Whether it was out of an abundance of caution, or she was just destroying the evidence, Trey's going out in Viking style. You won't see zombies performing such rituals for their fallen. They'd just as likely eat them, un-barbecued.

Cam (Keenan Tracey), whose mother died some years ago, tries to console the grieving Luke, and it appears as though the two who have been on particularly shaky ground after Cam threw a rock through Luke's SUV window are on their way to burying the hatchet. But when Cam brings up his mother's death, Luke bristles: Why is Cam always trying to one-up his pain?

Meanwhile, Jai (Dejan Loyola) and Amy (Kristy Dawn Dinsmore) have crossed paths inside the Paymart, and have a moment to talk. Jai is still pretty shaken after having lost his patient, and frustrated with Amy's apparent indifference to the situation. Whether it's Jai's words or all the carnage, Amy has changed: She's serious about changing her life around, and she wants to do it with Jai. Does this mean they're back together? The deep, prolonged kiss they share would indicate yes.

Out in the woods, an injured and shaken Blackwood (Morgan Holmstrom) has summoned just enough energy to hobble her way to a nearby house, enter, and pass out on the living room floor. Luckily the house belongs to her grandmother, but Blackwood senior is only slightly less peeved than a stranger might be. She hasn't seen her granddaughter Sarah for over three years, and this is the reunion she gets?

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When Sarah wakes up, she shows her grandmother the mask she picked up off the zombie in the drilling hole, and her grandmother is mortified. In the Lenape tribe, there was a legend of a monster that plagued the Indigenous people almost as much as the white colonizer. The monster, a zombie, was turning white men as well as Indigenous folk, and the Lenape and their colonizer formed a temporary alliance to vanquish their shared enemy and imprison the O.G. zombie in the hole. Why imprison Patient Zero in a hole? The white man was afraid to kill the root evil. That's white Man, Jesus-freak, messianic logic for you.

And though Mawinhaken will probably not be witnessing the Epiphany anytime soon, they will get a chance to watch some good old fashioned matrimony. Back at the Paymart, Jai and Amy have chosen to go through with their wedding, and spouse-of-the-century Mayor Bowman officiates. She gives a rousing, and not a little hypocritical speech to the newlyweds about the sanctity of marriage and the paramount importance of love.

This is too much for Luke to handle, and he erupts in an explosion of truth about his parents' failed marriage, and even Trey's stepping out with Nicole. Then he drops the real big one: He comes out as gay, and he doesn't think his mom even cares enough about him to be interested. After some harsh words and even some physical violence, Luke storms away.

But this bit of uniquely human drama will have to be continued later. The zombies have breached the perimeter. It's all hands on deck.

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BSU professor presents on zombies and colonialism as part of Native American Heritage Month events – Bemidji Pioneer

The lecture, entitled How Columbus Discovers America: An Indigenous Interpretation of the Zombieland Frontier, was held in conjunction with other events for Native American Heritage Month.

Using the 2009 movie Zombieland, Uran detailed several similarities between the films events and the displacement and mass genocide of Native Americans following European immigration to the original Easter Island.

The recognition of a crime as being murder demands that the victim be deemed human, and theres absolutely no way youre allowed to count a zombie as human, Uran said during the lecture. Much in the same way, for a long time, it was in some places against the law to count Indigenous peoples as human beings.

Uran walked through the movies plot, comparing the plot points, settings, story arch and characters names -- Columbus, Wichita, Tallahassee and Little Rock -- to the past events and current understandings of Indigenous experiences.

Theres a story of replacement going on here. The Indian names show how -- the claiming of a connection to the land, the claiming of a new identity, the merging of a new American personality from this frontier violence -- has taken on the aesthetics of Indigeneity, Uran said.

He continued, Zombies do not count as humans in these films and the ease for which we can dehumanize an entire population and then justify their eradication is the very logic of genocide.

Following the lecture, a question and answer session allowed attendees both in-person and through Zoom to ask questions, where Uran touched on how he became involved in this line of research.

Well, I loved zombie movies and at some point, I just became a habitual overthinker, Uran mentioned with a laugh. Another part was trying to figure out my own experience in the world. Why is this always so hard? Why are people like this? Its because these are the stories we tell over and over again and hear over and over again.

He continued by expanding on a point he made during the lecture of how zombies are seen as the ultimate other in films, or someone for which everything thats wrong with humanity can be projected on.

People who are othered in those stories face the consequences of those stories over and over again, he added.

Uran answered other questions relating to his thoughts on diversity, equity and inclusion if colonialism can be deconstructed and his teaching experiences.

With regard to being an Indigenous Studies professor, he emphasized that, Im in Indigenous Studies and when I say that, people say, well, you teach about Indians. And I dont. I teach about colonialism. Thats one of the reasons I try to do this kind of work.

The full Zoom lecture can be viewed on the BSU website.

The AIRC has kept busy this month offering other events in honor of November, which is Native American Heritage Month. Meanwhile, Native American Heritage Day is Friday, Nov. 26, this year.

On Nov. 4, the AIRC partnered with the Center for Sustainability Studies and Sustainability Office to offer three local Indigenous tea-making workshops as part of a traditional skills workshop series.

Indigenous Sustainability Professor Awanookwe Kingbird-Bratvold led attendees through the process of identifying, preparing and brewing tea from local plants.

Last year marked 30 years of the official federal recognition of Native American Heritage Month.

President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution in 1990 designating November of that year "National American Indian Heritage Month." Similar proclamations have been issued each year since 1994 under varying names.

Several states also designate Columbus Day as Native American Day, though this doesn't currently have federal recognition as a national legal holiday.

The first efforts to adopt a day recognizing Indigenous peoples arose when Seneca Nation member Dr. Arthur C. Parker persuaded the Boy Scouts of America to set aside a day for the "First Americans," which was honored the following three years according to the Native American Heritage Month government site.

The first American Indian Day in a state was declared on the second Saturday in May 1916 by a New York governor with several other states declaring their own different days through the 1910s.

More information can be found at nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov.

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Warnings of orphan and zombie wells spark debate on bonding by oil, gas companies – The Denver Post

Proposed reforms meant to ensure taxpayers dont get stuck paying to clean up oil and gas sites could actually leave the public open to eventually covering billions of dollars in costs, environmentalists and local governments contend.

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, which regulates the industry, is considering new rules to make sure companies have the money to properly close wells, remove equipment and clean up the site. But the latest draft of the rules is a big step backward, local elected officials, community and environmental activists told the commission in recent hearings.

A third version of the proposals is due out Dec. 7, with hearings scheduled in January and February. At the heart of the proposals is making sure companies have the money to close and clean up wells or that there are funds to cover the costs if a company goes bankrupt or walks away without doing the work.

An update of what the commission calls financial assurances from oil and gas companies is mandated by Senate Bill 181, a 2019 law that directed an overhaul of the states rules and prioritized public health and environment when regulating the industry.

Critics say revisions by the COGCC staff to earlier proposals dont comply with SB 181s directive that every operator provide assurance that its financially capable of meeting all its obligations under the law.

In a nutshell, with the newest draft, theyve really reverted to the same unlawful practices that got them into trouble in the first place, said Mike Freeman, an attorney with Earthjustice,who is representing environmental and community groups before the commission.

Freeman pointed to a proposal to maintain the current practice of allowing companies to put up a so-called blanket bond. Operators have been able to post a $100,000 bond to cover all their wells statewide, an amount critics say likely wouldnt cover the cost of shutting down even one well.

Environmental and community groups and some local governments support requiring bonds for every single well to cover the full cleanup costs. Alternatives, they suggested, are individual bonds for new wells and those transferred to other companies.

During the Nov. 9 COGCC hearing, Boulder County Commissioner Matt Jones said he sponsored bills when he was a state senator to address financial guarantees for oil and gas companies and discovered the rules are a hot mess. He was among the local elected officials who urged state officials to strengthen the proposed rules.

An operator can meet all the bonding and operating requirements and still manage to avoid spending what it costs to properly plug and remediate wells, Jones said. The marginal operators can and do use this current rule as a business strategy to squeeze even more profit from wells while avoiding responsibility for the costs and harms

The proposed rules would significantly increase the blanket bonds. But speakers during recent hearings said there still wouldnt not be enough money if a company has hundreds or thousands of wells.

Wells and oil and gas sites whose owners cant be found or are left without being properly shut down and reclaimed are called orphans by the state. The current backlog is 254 orphan wells and 547 orphan well sites.

Although Colorado has a low number of orphan wells compared to other states, environmental and community groups point to the huge number of what some call zombie wells. Those are wells that produce little or no oil or gas and whose owners might not have the money to plug, or close, them.

A report by Carbon Tracker, a London-based nonprofit that analyzes financial issues around climate change and fossil fuels, said Colorados liability for its roughly 50,000 active wells could be at least $7 billion. The group puts the price tag at $280 billion nationwide, saying bonds posted by the industry cover just 1% of the estimated costs.

Were not asserting that the state is going to pay to plug all of these wells. Many of these wells are certainly going to be plugged by the operators. The question is how many, said Rob Schuwerk, executive director of Carbon Tracker North America.

The point was to show the potential liability and that states arent doing enough to ensure taxpayers dont wind up paying the bill, Schuwerk said.

The COGCC estimates it costs on average $82,500 to plug and reclaim an orphan well, while Carbon Trackers figure is $140,000 to $150,000, based on well depth.

So far, Colorado taxpayers havent paid, according to the COGCC. A mill levy on oil and gas companies and revenue from penalties on operators help finance a program to cover the shutdown and cleanup costs for orphan wells and sites.

The proposed rules on financial assurances would increase the money in the orphan well program to $10 million from $5 million from an annual, per-well registration fee.

There is no orphan well emergency. According to COGCC statistics, fewer than 1% of Colorado wells have been orphaned, said Dave Neslin, a lawyer who represents PDC Energy, Occidental Petroleum and Noble Energy, acquired by Chevron Corp. in 2020.

There is also no pending orphan well crisis, Neslin, a former director of the COGCC, said in a recent hearing.

Neslin and attorney Matt Lepore, another former COGCC director who also represents the three major oil and gas companies, noted the industry has plugged and cleaned up a total of 8,473 wells from 2017 to 2020. They said in a statement that their clients accounted for 6,163 of those wells.

Neslin and Lepore said they agree the financial requirements should be updated, but dont support imposing a bond for each well.

The problem is that weve got a lot of really low-producing oil and gas wells in the state of Colorado, said Matt Sura, an attorney who represents environmental groups and local governments.

Data from the COGCC and analyzed by WildEarth Guardians, an environmental group, showed that 9,585, or 20% of the states wells produced nothing in 2020, Sura said. Another 17,284, or 33%, produced less than the equivalent of 1 barrel of oil a day.

The fear is that financial pressures could drive the companies into bankruptcy and turn the wells into orphans, Sura said.

Jackson County resident Barbara Vasquez said her area is home to a large field of stripper wells, which produce the equivalent of fewer than 15 barrels a day. She said the revisions to the draft financial rules seem to be giving more protection to small operators and less to public health, the environment and taxpayer dollars.

The proposed exemption of state financial requirements for wells on federal lands would violate the law, said Tom Delehanty, representing the Sierra Club, Earthworks and the League of Oil and Gas Impacted Coloradans. He noted the state issues drilling permits for federal lands.

Susan Noble told oil and gas commissioners in a Nov. 9 hearing that they should follow Commerce Citys lead and require a $95,000 per-well cash bond and not allow any blanket bonds.

Were no longer in the era of Im a little teapot pump jacks bobbing on the horizon. Were looking at industrial-strength sites with a number of facilities above ground and among residential areas, said Noble, a member of the Commerce City Council.

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Warnings of orphan and zombie wells spark debate on bonding by oil, gas companies - The Denver Post


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America’s Favorite Zombie Officer Returns on 4K with Blue Underground’s Maniac Cop II and III – Critical Blast

In 1988 William Lustig directed the film Maniac Cop, written by Larry Cohen, which received lackluster reviews and box office revenues at the time. But later, when released onto the home video markets, the film became a cult classic, spawning two follow up sequels which have recently made their way to a 4K release.

Two years after the first film, Lustig reassembled the cast to create Maniac Cop 2, again written by Larry Cohen and starring Robert Davi, Claudia Christian, Michael Lerner, and Bruce Campbell, with Robert Z'Dar returning as the baddie in blue.

Maniac Cop 2, which many see as an improvement on the first tale, is full of murderous mayhem, jump scares, and strippers, and continues the story of our undead detective on his mission of revenge and cleaning the streets of crime, leaving them washed red with blood.

In 1993, Lusting and Cohen brought Robert ZDar back from the dead one more time for Maniac Cop III: Badge of Silence. Often touted as the weakest of the Maniac Cop trilogy of terror, it was panned and review bombed upon release, and only until recently has begun to find its place walking that thin blue line between horror and comedy.

Borderline unwatchable at times, Cohen diverts from his tried-and-true blue revenge tale and introduces a witch doctor that brings our hero back to the living to do his bidding, instead of sticking to the formula of a zombie cop walking the beat, ridding the streets of the scum and criminals a formula audiences loved and expected from the first two previous outings.

The transfers to 4K and Blu-ray look gorgeous and really bring these films back to life. Even if the story is lackluster at times, the crystal-clear definition brings you directly back into the time the films were made and detains your imagination.

So if you want a good old fashioned horror double-feature night, lock yourself up with these two cult films, and I guarantee you won't remain silent from all the jump scares that await you.

Maniac Cop 2 3.5/5.0

Maniac Cop III: Badge of Silence 2.5/5.0

Maniac Cop 2 Features and Specs

Disc 1 (4K UHD Blu-ray) Feature Film + Extras:

Audio Commentary with Director William Lustig and Filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn

Theatrical Trailers

Isolated Music Track

Disc 2 (Blu-ray) Feature Film + Extras:

Audio Commentary with Director William Lustig and Filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn

Back On the Beat The Making of MANIAC COP 2

Cinefamily Q&A with Director William Lustig

Deleted Scene

Theatrical Trailers

Poster & Still Gallery

Isolated Music Track

Disc 2 (Blu-ray) Feature Film + Extras:

Audio Commentary with Director William Lustig and Filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn

Back On the Beat The Making of MANIAC COP 2

Cinefamily Q&A with Director William Lustig

Deleted Scene

Theatrical Trailers

Poster & Still Gallery

Isolated Music Track

Maniac Cop 3: Badge of Silence Features and Specs

Disc 1 (4K UHD Blu-ray) Feature Film + Extras:

NEW! Audio Commentary with Director Alan Smithee

Theatrical Trailer

Disc 2 (Blu-ray) Feature Film + Extras:

NEW! Audio Commentary with Director Alan Smithee

Wrong Arm of The Law The Making of MANIAC COP 3

Deleted and Extended Scenes

Theatrical Trailer

Poster & Still Gallery

Original Synopsis

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America's Favorite Zombie Officer Returns on 4K with Blue Underground's Maniac Cop II and III - Critical Blast


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The Walking Dead World Beyond finale, how to watch early – Undead Walking

The Walking Dead World Beyond was created to be a two-season spin-off series of The Walking Dead. This series started as a coming of age in the apocalypse that developed into a plan to take down the CRM. Fans are hoping to see some significant developments in the final two episodes.

Aliyah Royale as Iris, Alexa Mansour as Hope, Joe Holt as Leo, Allan Edwards as Dr. Ellis The Walking Dead: World Beyond Photo Credit: Steve Swisher/AMC

World Beyond has stepped up its game in season two and feels more like a series worthy of TWDU. Season one established the characters, most of whom had been living within the protection of walls since the outbreak or the night the sky fell, as it is referred to in World Beyond.

The second season sees the group out in the wild fighting for their lives and the lives of many others. Gone is the scared group we first encountered and in its place is a group of young adults willing to make considerable sacrifices to ensure they have a future.

Nicolas Cantu as Elton, Madelyn Kientz as Asha The Walking Dead: World Beyond _ Season 2, Episode 8 Photo Credit: Steve Swisher/AMC

Sunday, November 28, World Beyond will air its ninth episode of season two, Death and the Dead, on AMC. This is also the day that fans who subscribe to AMC+ will be able to view the series finale The Last Light.

This is always a cause for worry of spoilers as people just cant wait to divulge any tidbits for the upcoming episode. This will be especially true of a series finale. So, watch out.

This season World Beyond has shown The Bennett family and their fight to figure out what the CRM is all about. With help from their friends and other allies, they have done some deep undercover work to find out that the CRM is quite the operation that is experimenting on the undead and have destroyed Omaha with plans to do the same to Portland.

Annet Mahendru as Huck, Pollyanna McIntosh as Jadis, Joe Holt as Leo The Walk _ Season 2, Episode 7 Photo Credit: Steve Swisher/AMC

The CRM doesnt take kindly to people who question their actions and will send them off to be rehabilitated, and if that doesnt take, they will become test subjects as they search for a cure.

Fans hoped to hear more about Rick Grimes with the crossover of Jadis from the flagship series. She was the last person we knew to see him alive. Jadis and Rick were carried off in a CRM helicopter after the bridge explosion. The only bit we have heard about him is that she traded something of value to the CRM to gain entrance. That something of value was Rick. Perhaps one of the two remaining episodes will give us something more about Rick.

The thought is that this series will segway into The Walking Dead movies that will see Andrew Lincoln reprise his role as Rick Grimes.

The Walking Dead World Beyond will air its season finale on December 5 on AMC. This episode is currently available to stream on AMC+.

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The Walking Dead World Beyond finale, how to watch early - Undead Walking


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Fear the Walking Dead Recap: Season 7 Episode 7 [Spoiler] Returns – TVLine

The bulk of Sundays eventful Fear the Walking Dead swirled around Strand, his head growing heavier and heavier as it wore the crown. But not even the shocker at the climax of his part of the hour could compete with the moment that viewers had been waiting and waiting for: Alicias return and Alycia Debnam-Careys first appearance since Season 6.

In Strands leg of The Portrait, though he turned away pretty much everyone who sought refuge at the tower even folks that Howard noted might have been of use he allowed in Morgan, if only to let June examine an ailing baby Mo (who it turned out had a double ear infection). Soon, not only were the Stalkers catapulting walkers at the highrise, they were setting off bombs and threatening to hurl walkers equipped with radioactive add-ons though the windows if Victor didnt grant them sanctuary. At the same time, Strand keeled over hed been poisoned! (How very Shakespearian, no?)

In the pickle of all pickles, Victor decided to let Morgan go to the armory to radio Grace for help from the outside. He even caved to Morgans demand to lower the tot down an elevator shaft to him, past several grasping walkers. (Now, I wouldnt trust Victor for anything, but I dunno if Id have let my baby go spelunking anywhere near a buncha zombies looking tasty and all!)

After beseeching Morgan to find Alicia, because I dont think shed want me to find her, Victor was sure that his frenemy would not return for him. Yet return, Morgan did with news that Grace and Sarah had done the dirty work outside and the tower had been saved from the Stalkers. Now, Strand had a chance to turn the place into a safe haven so welcoming, it would impress even Alicia.

Alas, as Morgan was giving Victor his pep talk, Strand noticed that his adversarys fingers had on them the same color blue as the poison hed upchucked Morgan had tried to off his nemesis when theyd shared a drink earlier! Take him to the roof! Victor ordered.

But of course, Strand didnt manage to send Morgan over the side. Instead, he let Grace strike a bargain over the intercom: If he let Morgan live, shed help identify and neutralize the walkers that were wearing radioactive material. Ultimately, Morgan was allowed to leave sans Mo, and Grace was allowed to enter (though the door for her was said not to be the revolving kind). I am gonna find my way back to you, Morgan promised.

No, you wont, Victor retorted. But Im gonna give them everything that you couldnt. Starting, presumably, with a megalomaniac to deal with!

As his end of the episode concluded, he called for lil Mo, adding creepily, Shes gotta get used to her new father sometime. [Shudder]

Meanwhile, back out in the wilds, as casually as you might a friend at the Starbucks around the corner, Morgan bumped into Dwight and Sherry, who were wandering about with what looked like Stalkers. Their leader wanted to speak with Morgan, too, the couple said.

Do I even need to tell you that their leader turned out to be Alicia? She assured Morgan that the Stalkers whod attacked the tower werent her people, at least not anymore. And as happy as she was to see her old pal, I brought you here cause I need your helpThese people are tired, hungry, getting desperate.

If she wanted Morgan to put in a good word with Strand, she was gonna be [bleep] outta luck. But their conversation didnt even get that far, since some walkers approached with radioactive material strapped to them, and before anyone could comprehend the words Dont shoot! theyd been shot, releasing toxic gas into the atmosphere. Everybody run now! cried Morgan. And that was that.

So, what did you think of Alicias comeback after so long? Worth the wait? And for that matter, Wendells less momentous reappearance? We hadnt seen him in even longer than wed seen Alicia! Hit the comments with your thoughts.

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Fear the Walking Dead Recap: Season 7 Episode 7 [Spoiler] Returns - TVLine


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